Pop-up pangolin card

Make and send a pop-up pangolin card. The cute pangolin mom playing with her pangopup appears when you open the card.

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For a pdf template and instructions, click on this image:
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Use your card to help raise awareness of pangolins! Send it to a friend who might not know that pangolins even exist. Add some pangolin facts to the front and back of the card.

  • Pangolins are mammals with large overlapping scales covering their bodies.
  • The scales are made of keratin, just like our fingernails.
  • 20% of a pangolin’s weight is comprised of scales.
  • As a defense against predators, they roll up into a ball. Even lions and tigers can’t prise them open.
  • A pangolin’s tongue is longer than it’s body. The tongue is sticky and they use them to catch ants and termites.
  • A pangolin can eat 70 million ants per year.
  • There are eight species of pangolin: four in Asia and four in Africa.
  • Sadly, a pangolin is snatched from the wild every five minutes! They are the most most illegally traded wild mammals on the planet. They are poached for their meat, which is eaten as a luxury dish in parts of their range, and their scales which are used in Traditional Asian Medicine.

Find out more about pangolins and the actions being taken to help them on The IUCN SSC Pangolin Specialist Group website

Click here for more pangolin crafts and colouring.

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Make a pangolin bauble for your Christmas tree

Add a Pangolin bauble to your Christmas tree to help raise awareness of these special animals.

Pangolin Christmas bauble

This bauble is has three layers: two outer decorated ones, and a third central one that helps provide the structure. All three slot into the square piece of card.

I used an old breakfast cereal box and scraps of wrapping paper for the scales.

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Pangolin Christmas bauble

Click on the image below to open a printable pdf, don’t forget to add an eye on each side.

3d bauble

 

Other pangolin crafts for Christmas – pop-up card and easy pangolin baubles.

Pop-up pangolin Christmas card

Pangolin Christmas baubles

 

Find out more about Pipisin the Pangolin.

 

 

 

 

Relax and colour your own snoozing binturong

Also known as a bearcat, even though they aren’t bears or cats, binturongs are large civets from south-east Asia that smell like buttered popcorn.

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Binturongs live in the canopy of tropical forests and will sleep high in tree branches, curling up with their heads tucked under their tails. They are one of only two carnivores (the other is the kinkajou) with a prehensile tail. The tail is almost as long as the body and acts like another limb when climbing.

They play an important role in spreading the seeds of the fruits that they eat. They are also one of the few animals animals with digestive enzymes capable of softening the tough outer covering of the seeds of strangler figs.

Considered rare throughout much of its range, the binturong is believed to be declining and is classed as vulnerable on the IUCN Red List. There are nine described subspecies of binturong, although the Palawan population (Arctictis binturong whitei) is often considered as a separate species.

 

 Colour a binturong

Click on the image for a printable pdf:

bearcat colouring

World Binturong Day is organised by ABConservation – the one and only association in the world that is entirely dedicated to the study and protection of binturongs. Find out more about their website and like them on Facebook.

 

Pangolin colouring page

Pangolins are the only mammals in the world with scales. The scales are made of keratin, the same material that finger nails and rhino horn are made from. The number of scales depends on the species – Sunda pangolins have been estimated to have about 900 to over 1000 scales.

But don’t worry, you don’t have to colour them all in individually…. unless you want to!

 

Click on the image for a downloadable pdf and enjoy your colouring!

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Palawan forest turtle

The Palawan forest turtle, also known as the Philippine pond turtle, is one of the rarest, most endangered, and least known turtles in the world. It is only found in five municipalities in Northern Palawan, Philippines and nowhere else in the world!

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This species lives in small streams in lowland forests. The beautiful coloration of juveniles and the impressive bodies of adults are rarely seen because the species is extremely shy and nocturnal. At dusk they emerge from their dens and shelters to forage on aquatic invertebrates, plants and wild fruits that fall into the stream. The latter helps to regenerate the riverine habitat since most of the seeds germinate after passing through the digestive tract. Adults also feed on the invasive golden apple snail, an alien pest species, while juveniles take mosquito larvae. By doing so they help reduce agricultural pest species and invertebrate-borne diseases.

Though physically extremely tough, the species is susceptible to stress and has low fertility. They are not doing well in captivity and have never been successfully captive bred.
Text re-posted from the Arkive blog

Colour your own Palawan forest turtle
Click on the image for a downloadable pdf

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